Edge of the Arctic

‘Edge of the Arctic’ highlights community on the frontlines of climate

Indigenous communities in the Arctic region are experiencing the drastic effects of climate change. Their homes and way of life are at risk as changes to the environment affect everyday lives.

Currently spoke with documentary filmmaker, Raul Gallego Abellan, who directed “Edge of the Arctic” a mini-documentary within a series called Fly on The Wall published in Aljazeera.

“Edge of the Arctic” depicts the story of the Arctic community of Tuktoyaktuk in Canada, who are at risk of losing their whole community to ice melt and sea-level rise driven by climate change.

Gallego Abellan says that while these communities are at great risk, he saw their resiliency and has hope that they will adapt to the changes.

“They are scared because their way of living is totally affected,” said Gallego Abellan. “They totally live connected to the land, but at the same time, I feel that they are people that they could adapt to the change.” 

Gallego Abellan was in Canada filming during the COP26 conference, he said being with people who are already so harmed by climate change, while world leaders did little to affect real change to protect communities made the conference seem disingenuous.

“We should do as much as possible, but we are so late,” said Gallego Abellan. “It makes you even more sad and angry, I was there during the COP meeting and you see the protests, and then you realize, these meetings are useless”

He says that many of us could learn from the Tuktoyaktuk community.

“I was very impressed with how they managed to work in balance with nature,” said Gallego Abellan. “How sad that we all don’t learn to manage nature and to respect nature in the same way that they do.”

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